Turtle Crew Neck - The Fox Festival
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Turtle Crew Neck

Turtle Crew Neck

$50.00

Chelonia Midas, the green sea turtle, is an endangered species. Green sea turtles get their name from their fatty tissue that turns green due to all the seagrass and algae that they consume. Turtles can live to be over 100 years old, grow to be more than 4 feet long and weigh hundreds of pounds.

Description

Common Name: Green Sea Turtle
Scientific Name: Chelonia Midas
IUCN Status: Endangered

Chelonia Midas, the green sea turtle, is an endangered species. Green sea turtles get their name from their fatty tissue that turns green due to all the seagrass and algae that they consume. Turtles can live to be over 100 years old, grow to be more than 4 feet long and weigh hundreds of pounds.

Unfortunately, these guys have a survive a lot in their lifetime. While they can lay thousands of eggs during their life, only 1 out of every 100 to 1000 eggs actually makes it to a fully mature turtle. This is due to their pray, such as racoons, foxes, crabs, birds, and lizards dig through the turtle egg nests before they are even born. If they do make it to a mature turtle, they then have to deal with coastal threats such as beach erosion, coastal development and human interference.

Another big issue that turtles face is the effect of global warming. Global warming impacts the sex of the turtles when they are in the nest. The eggs on the bottom become males because of the cooler temperature. On the contrary, the warmer part of the nest become females. With an increase of global temperatures worldwide, more nests are seeing an increase of females. If temperature continues to rise, it could disrupt the ratio of female and male turtles for generations to come.

Other threats to sea turtles are caused by humans. In many parts of the world, they hunt green sea turtles to make turtle soup. Recently though, we have seen an influx of efforts to create and enforce laws to protect sea turtles in the ocean.

Another issue that sea turtles struggle with are being caught as bycatch, getting caught in marine debris, being hit by boats, and because of their limited habitat. Because they are air breathing reptiles they spend time in shallow warm waters where they rest at the surface. Boat strikes are common and typically fatal. There are a lot of volunteer efforts, such as beach nest lookouts and a detangling crews. These volunteers help save the lives of so many turtles every year. In order to combat these issues, Slacktyde gives 10% of the sales for every item sold with the sea turtle design to the Gumbo Limbo Turtle Center in Florida.